Chang’e 4 Sent Home Stunning Images From The Dark Side Of The Moon

Back in 2019, China’s Yutu 2 rover and Chang’e 4 lander arrived on the dark side of the Moon. Since now, they’ve been examining the Von Karman crater and displaying the findings through a sole link – the Queqiao relay satellite that fires signals to our planet. As an element of the mission, the rover and lander have been capturing lots of pictures.

The Chinese Lunar Exploration Program has just launched a bunch of information from the mission’s devices, after gathering a photo library of many files. Also, the photos come in high-resolution from Chang’e 4’s landing camera and ground camera, and Yutu 2’s panoramic shooter, as well.

The pictures were shot over 12 lunar days, and because of how Moon twists, its day-night cycle persists only over 29 days. A lunar day, for example, means two weeks in our time, during which the project is in permanent sunlight, required for its solar-fueled progress.

Chang’e 4 Sent Home Stunning Images From The Dark Side Of The Moon

The devices then stoked down for the two-week night. So, there are 12 of those cycles per our planet’s year, which shows the information launch covers a year’s worth of pictures. Until now, the rover has made a circuitous route a little over 350 meters over the 180-kilometer broad Von Karman crater, which is part of a much more massive, older, and unwell analyzed contact site dubbed the South Pole-Aitken vessel.

It’s almost 2,500 kilometers across, approximately a quarter of the Moon. It is photographing picturesque landscapes and rock displays, documenting the ground on the last unexplored far surface of the Moon – an area where no other lander has successfully performed before.

The abundance of information the mission is delivering might bring some light not only on the history of the Moon and that strange massive giant impact vessel but on the records of the Solar System itself.

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