Neanderthal Genes Indicate How Ancient Humans Migrated From Africa

As recent research resurfaces, we learn about how modern humans might have left the continent approximately 200,000 years ago. In the last decades, many of us have been left in awe, even shocked, to find out from some popular genetic tests that their DNA is related to Neanderthal genes.

Those genes were first identified back in 2010, in a research of some Neanderthal fossils. From DNA recovered from the ancient bones, scientists figured out that modern humans interbred with Neanderthals almost 60,000 years ago, after moving from Africa.

So, we got some intriguing results that show how non-Africans nowadays are 1 % to 2 % Neanderthal.

People of African ancestry, it was believed, have little to no Neanderthal DNA. Utilizing a novel method to examine DNA, however, a team of researchers has discovered proof that significantly redesigns previous beliefs.

Neanderthal Genes Indicate How Ancient Humans Migrated From Africa

Those ancient humans interbred with Neanderthals, the new research indicates. As an effect, Neanderthals were already delivering genes from modern humans when the upcoming migration from Africa happened, almost 140,000 years later.

Researchers also identified some proof that people living in a particular region in western Eurasia returned to Africa and interbred with people whose ancestors never left. “The legacy of gene flow with Neanderthal likely exists in all modern humans, highlighting our shared history,” detailed the authors.

Moreover, while proof has been shaping that modern people moved from Africa in waves and that those migrations started much earlier than once believed. Some researchers even began debating the proof that the ones of African descent might be having Neanderthal genes.

Our ancestors and the Neanderthals lived almost 600,000 years ago in Africa. The Neanderthal genealogy left the continent; the fossils of what we describe as Neanderthals comes from 200,000 years to 40,000 years in age, and are discovered in Siberia, Europe, and the Near East.

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